Whoop Strap 4

Whoop Strap 4

Whoop
Bluetooth

Passé en revue le : 9 août 2022

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Mozilla a effectué 8 heures de recherches
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L’avis de Mozilla :

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Vote du public : Pas flippant

With the Whoop Strap (that's fun to say three times real fast) you don't buy a device, you join a membership. The device comes with the membership. For $30 a month you get the Whoop Strap device, access to the Whoop app which gives you tons and tons of metrics on things like sleep, stress, and exercise. The Whoop app (that's also really fun to say!) also gives you access to customized coaching to help you sleep better and train better. Given the growing following this little strap full of LEDs and photodiodes seems to have, it seems there's a lot to whoop about with Whoop. Yeah, yeah, even I know that pun was bad.

Update: In June 2022, after Roe vs Wade was overturned allowing US states to make access to abortion illegal, we took another look at Whoop's privacy and security as a device that can track menstrual cycle and reproductive health data. Our updated review is below. Overall, Whoop does a pretty good job of protecting their users privacy and security and clearly states how they will handle potential law enforcement requests for any reproductive health tracking data.

Que pourrait-il se passer en cas de problème ?

The Whoop Strap is an interesting device. By all accounts, it measures a lot of body metrics, like body temperature, respiratory rate, and blood oxygen data quite well. And data is the name of the game for Whoop, so using algorithms to analyze all this data is key. All this becomes much more interesting when you read about how Whoop is being used to try and identify covid-19 symptoms early on. And how workplaces are asking (requiring?) their employees to wear such a tracking band to help them identify workers at risk for covid to keep them out of the workplace before they can infect others. It’s an interesting use of this sort of tracking technology with some good public health implications while also raising some serious privacy concerns.

When it comes to how Whoop handles your data, things seem pretty OK to us. Whoop says they do not sell personal data. Yay! And Whoop says they don’t use any personally identifiable wellness data for advertising purposes. Again, yay! They do use some personal data such as website browsing patterns and other similar usage behavior for interest-based advertising though. Boo, but not the hugest boo ever.

And they do say they may "use Aggregated Data, De-identified Data or other anonymous data from Personal Data we collect, including Wellness Data, for our business purpose...," and research purposes too. We don't love this, although it is pretty common. And it’s a good time to remind you that it’s been found to be pretty easy to de-anonymize some types of data and track down an individual’s patterns, especially with location data. Our biggest concern for the handling of all this sensitive personal data the Whoop collects is what happens to it when users opt to share with others through social media or corporate wellness programs. Once you agree to share your Whoop personal data with these sorts of third parties, then you need to rely on them to protect it and read their privacy policies to understand they can use it.

All in all Whoop does collect a huge amount of sensitive personal data, as most fitness trackers do. They also seem to do a decent job protecting this data and the privacy of their users. What’s the worst that could happen? Well, it seems in our brave new world these days it’s not too far fetched to think an employer could require you to wear one of these bands to monitor you for covid symptoms. But they take that monitoring way beyond that and look to see which employees drink on the weekends. The company then decides that’s against their code of conduct and fires you for what you do in your off hours. That’s some Big Brother potential right there. Here’s hoping that never happens.

Update, August 2022 following the overturn of Roe vs Wade protection reproductive health rights in the United States.
We reviewed the privacy and security practices of Whoop following the overturning of Roe vs Wade in the US. Whoop does offer what they call Menstrual Cycle Coaching and has participated in research that used their tracking wearable to study the impact of exercise on pregnant people and babies.

So, what should people using these features know about Whoop? Well, it's good they don't share personal wellness data with third parties for advertising, although they do share some personal usage and tracking data for that purpose. They also say they can share personal data with "Professional advisors, such as lawyers, auditors, bankers and insurers, where necessary in the course of the professional services they render to us." Which is potentially a lot of sharing and the more sharing the more we worry. Finally, when it comes to sharing personal information with law enforcement they say they share data with "law enforcement, government authorities, and private parties we believe in good faith to be necessary or appropriate to comply with the law or legal process," which is a rather vague outline of how they share. We much prefer when companies state they won't give up user data to law enforcement unless required to under subpoena, and even then, we like to see them commit to only giving up the bare minimum necessary.

All in all, should people be concerned about using Whoop to track things like period, fertility, and pregnancy? Well, as with most of the things we reviewed, we'd recommend caution. Whoop does collect a good amount of data and does share some of it and doesn't have a clear and strong policy of not sharing with law enforcement. Could something go wrong with this data? Yes. Is it likely that it will, we sure hope not as Whoop tends to be OK (but not great) on privacy otherwise.

Conseils pour vous protéger

  • Minimize volumes of data collected about you by an app
  • Use two-factor authentication
  • Be very careful what third party companies you consent to share you health data with. If you do decided to share your health data with another company, read their privacy policy to see how they protect, secure, and share or sell your data.
  • Use your device privacy controls to limit access to your personal information via app (do not give access to your camera, microphone, images and videos)
  • Keep your app regularly updated
  • Limit ad tracking via your device (eg on iPhone go to Privacy -> Advertising -> Limit ad tracking) and biggest ad networks (for Google, go to Google account and turn off ad personalization)
mobile Confidentialité Sécurité IA

Ce produit peut-il m’espionner ? informations

Caméra

Appareil : Non

Application : Non

Microphone

Appareil : Non

Application : Non

Piste la géolocalisation

Appareil : Non

Application : Oui

Que peut-on utiliser pour s’inscrire ?

Quelles données l’entreprise collecte-t-elle ?

Comment l’entreprise utilise-t-elle les données ?

Whoop does not sell personal data. Whoop uses aggregated or de-identified wellness data that no longer identifies a particular individual, for research purposes. Whoop does not use personally identifiable wellness data for marketing or advertising purposes.

Whoop does not use personally identifiable Wellness Data for marketing or advertising purposes.

Your data may be shared with advertising partners that may collect information on Whoop website through Cookies and other automated technologies, including for the interest-based advertising. Whoop does not share your wellness data with advertising partners.

How the company says they may share data with law enforcement:
"We use Personal Data for the following purposes:
Respond to law enforcement requests and as required by applicable law, court order, or governmental regulations."

Comment pouvez-vous contrôler vos données ?

Whoop will delete/give you access to your personal data if you ask to, including if asked when you cancel your membership. You may request a full deletion of your account and corresponding data by emailing [email protected]

Whoop may share your data to respond to law enforcement requests and as required by applicable law, court order, or governmental regulations.

Quel est l’historique de l’entreprise en matière de protection des données des utilisateurs et utilisatrices ?

Moyen

No known incidents in the last 3 years.

Informations liées à la vie privée des enfants

"If you are under 13, or 16 where applicable, please do not attempt to register for the Services or send any Personal Data about yourself to us. If we learn that we have collected Personal Data from a child under age 13, or 16 where applicable, we will delete that information as quickly as possible. If you believe that a child under 13, or 16 where applicable, may have provided us Personal Data, please contact us at [email protected]"

Ce produit peut-il être utilisé hors connexion ?

Non

Informations relatives à la vie privée accessibles et compréhensibles ?

Oui

Simple privacy principles are provided.

Liens vers les informations concernant la vie privée

Ce produit respecte-t-il nos critères élémentaires de sécurité ? informations

Oui

Chiffrement

Oui

Mot de passe robuste

Oui

Mises à jour de sécurité

Oui

Gestion des vulnérabilités

Oui

Politique de confidentialité

Oui

Le produit utilise-t-il une IA ? informations

Impossible à déterminer

Cette IA est-elle non digne de confiance ?

Impossible à déterminer

Quel genre de décisions l’IA prend-elle à votre sujet ou pour vous ?

L’entreprise est-elle transparente sur le fonctionnement de l’IA ?

Impossible à déterminer

Les fonctionnalités de l’IA peuvent-elles être contrôlées par l’utilisateur ou l’utilisatrice ?

Impossible à déterminer


Actualités

Employers Want to Track Your Health With Wearable Fitness Trackers During COVID
Mel Magazine
WHOOP fitness bands and the like are being sold as the only way to get workplaces up and running again — privacy considerations be damned.
How Whoop is Fighting Covid-19
WHOOP
WHOOP is a wrist-worn heart rate monitor that tracks health data including your body’s recovery, respiratory rate, and activities 24/7 to help you optimize your well-being.
The Whoop Strap 4.0 launches today, 2 years after its predecessor
Ars Technica
The data-focused wearable adds blood oxygen and temperature sensors.
The Whoop Strap and Oura Ring Are Measuring the Impact of Menstruation and Pregnancy on Athletes as Women's Research and Tech Finally Rise
SportTechie
Within the past year, Whoop has become the official fitness wearable of both the LPGA Tour and the WTA and published research using its metrics. One retrospective study culled data from nearly 4,600 participants to identify recovery patterns in different phases of the menstrual cycle. Another smaller study analyzed Whoop data from 12 women throughout a pregnancy and postpartum phase to see how their bodies responded to exercise during that time.
New WHOOP Feature: Menstrual Cycle Coaching
WHOOP
The menstrual cycle causes dramatic hormonal shifts throughout the month, producing different physiological responses. In some phases you may be more able to take on strain, can work out harder and experience higher gains, while in other phases you may need more sleep. By tracking menstruation in the WHOOP Journal, the Strain Coach and Sleep Coach can calibrate to each phase of your cycle and provide recommendations based on your phase.
WHOOP Features Support Reproductive Health Through All Life Stages
WHOOP
In 2021, WHOOP initiated Menstrual Cycle Coaching, and now we’re introducing new Journal toggles to track and better understand changes at every stage of life, from trying to conceive through postmenopause. Women go through numerous physiological changes in their lives that they can track by enabling reproductive health Journal toggles. WHOOP members can see how their strain, heart rate, heart rate variability, sleep, recovery, and habits change in the Monthly Performance Assessment.
Using wearable tech to keep babies, pregnant women healthy
WVU Today
Doctors’ opinions vary widely when it comes to exercise during pregnancy because research into pregnant women’s fitness has been scarce. But with a new study, Shon Rowan—an associate professor with the West Virginia University School of Medicine—is using wearable technology to fill that knowledge gap.

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