Sennheiser Momentum True Wireless 2

Sennheiser Momentum True Wireless 2

Sennheiser
Bluetooth

Review date: Nov. 8, 2021

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Mozilla says

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People voted: Not creepy

Bespoke 7 mm dynamic drivers! No idea what those are, but they sound fancy and come in these wireless earbuds from Sennheiser. These little buds also feature high quality sound, active and passive noise cancelling, what they call transparent hearing functionality (so you can hear the noise around you), and a Bluetooth connected app that lets you control it all on your phone. Unfortunately they also had a pretty big security oops back in 2018. Here's hoping Sennheiser learned their lesson from that.

What could happen if something goes wrong?

We love that Sennheiser doesn't collect any personal data on its users. And because they don’t collect any data on you, there is no personal data to share with third parties. Yay! What a novel idea!

They did have a security problem in 2018 when Sennheiser’s flawed Headsetup headphone software opened PCs and Macs to website spoofing, which isn't great, but was also fixed rather quickly. And, as always, if you use Google Assistant or Alexa with these headphones, that voice data is sent back to Google or Amazon.

All in all though, we don't think Sennheiser's headphones should scare you much at all.

Tips to protect yourself

  • Check Seenheiser Momentum FAQ for tips for safeset set-up
mobile Privacy Security A.I.

Can it snoop on me? information

Camera

Device: No

App: No

Microphone

Device: Yes

App: No

Tracks location

Device: No

App: Yes

What can be used to sign up?

What data does the company collect?

How does the company use this data?

No personal data collected by the company, so it is not shared. Sennheiser says,

"Sennheiser itself does not collect and process any personal data using Google Firebase (for details see below). Therefore, Sennheiser does not transfer personal data to third parties."

How can you control your data?

You have the right to receive free information about your data stored by Sennheiser.

What is the company’s known track record of protecting users’ data?

Average

Sennheiser’s flawed headphone software opened PCs and Macs to HTTPS site spoofing in November, 2018.

Can this product be used offline?

Yes

User-friendly privacy information?

Yes

Links to privacy information

Does this product meet our Minimum Security Standards? information

Yes

Encryption

Yes

Uses encryption for the Bluetooth.

Strong password

Yes

Security updates

N/A

Manages vulnerabilities

Yes

Sennheiser has a bug bounty program.

Privacy policy

Yes

Does the product use AI? information

Yes

You can connect to Alexa.

Is this AI untrustworthy?

Can’t Determine

What kind of decisions does the AI make about you or for you?

If you connect to Alexa, the voice recognition is used.

Is the company transparent about how the AI works?

N/A

Does the user have control over the AI features?

Yes


News

Sennheiser's flawed headphone software opened PCs and Macs to HTTPS site spoofing
Zack Whittaker
Headphone maker Sennheiser has patched its software after the company admitted a serious vulnerability that made it easy for hackers to impersonate any website — even encrypted pages.
The software for Sennheiser's high-end headphones have a bizarre and potentially dangerous bug that makes users vulnerable to hackers
Insider
Essentially, the vulnerability in the HeadSetup software allows hackers to show a "spoofed" website, such that a fake site can look real, including the "https:" at the beginning of the website's URL address, as well as the lock icon.

Comments

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