Ovia Fertility

Attention : *confidentialité non incluse avec ce produit

Ovia Fertility

Passé en revue le : 9 août 2022

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Mozilla a effectué 10 heures de recherches
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L’avis de Mozilla :

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Vote du public : Super flippant

Ovia Health, which describes itself in a rather wonky way as "the digital platform transforming episodic care into continuous support while improving family wellbeing and fostering positive outcomes," offers up three apps to help you on your reproductive health journey. There's Ovia Fertility, Ovia Pregnancy, and Ovia Parenting.

Ovia's Fertility tracking app says it "pinpoints your ovulation, predicts your period, and sends you a daily fertility score." It also offers users things like the ability to track basal body temperature, cervical fluid, cervical position, medications, tips and expert advice, health coaches, and more. And it says it uses "proprietary algorithms based on cutting-edge fertility research to help you track your cycle and predict your exact ovulation and fertile window." That's some technical stuff going on there. It definitely offers more than just the ability to enter when you started your period in a calendar. Which users might appreciate...or it might be a bit much. The app is free to download and use but you'll need a sponsored employer/health plan to unlock the premium benefits. How does Ovia look from privacy perspective? Well, they look pretty wonky there too.

Que pourrait-il se passer en cas de problème ?

When people ask us here at *Privacy Not Included what we do for a living we often joke that we read privacy policies so you don't have to. Well, you all are going to be super, duper glad we read Ovia's Health App Privacy Policy (they have another one that doesn't cover their apps) because it is 34 pages long with nearly 12,000 words. YIKES! Also, you're welcome.

So, what did we find in Ovia's War and Peace of privacy policies? Well, some stuff that has us worried about your privacy, unfortunately. First, Ovia says they can collect a whole lot of personal information on you. Things like name, email address, location, advertising ID, IP address, data about your activity in the apps, date of birth, cycle type and length, date of last menstrual period, baby’s name or nickname, and expected due date, information you give to Ovia's coaches, and any health tracking data you submit which could include weight, period, moods, symptoms, and more. So, like most fertility tracking apps, Ovia collects a whole lot of personal and usage information. Ovia also has this line in their privacy policy, "For marketing purposes, we may collect personal data about you through social media or from third parties who provide marketing services to us." So yeah, Ovia has a lot of info on you.

How do they say they plan to use this information? Well, in the free consumer version of the app, to show you ads and sponsored content using an advertising profile they create on you (nothing is ever free, remember). Ovia does clarify that they will only share personal information that directly identifies with advertisers and sponsors if you opt-in. We're unsure how clear this opt-in process is, though, so be careful when using the app and don't opt-in to any data sharing that directly identifies you. Ovia also says they can use your information for personalization of content, to send advertising and marketing content, market their products and services, and to conduct clinical and scientific research.

Who does Ovia say they can share the information they collect on you with? Well, a number of third parties, advertisers, health providers and employers it seems. This line from their privacy policy really jumped out at us, "We use Facebook technology in our apps so that users can log on via Facebook. This allows Facebook to collect device information, and data relating to your engagement with our apps, whether or not you use the Facebook login feature. Facebook may use that data to personalize advertising to you, both on and off Facebook." It's no secret we here at *Privacy Not Included are not big fans of Facebook due to their lack of respect for everyone's privacy. The fact that Ovia says they allow Facebook to collect information on their users, whether or not you use the Facebook login feature, really irks us.

There are also some questions that linger about Ovia's data sharing with health providers and employers. In 2019, the Washington Post reported concerns about Ovia sharing health data with employers. According to their privacy policy, Ovia says, "If you receive Ovia as a benefit from your employer, we do not share your health data with your employer unless you expressly opt-in for a specific purpose; ... However, we may share personal data with your employer health plan and their business associates, and with employee benefits management vendors, consistent with HIPAA or other privacy laws."
And in 2020, Consumer Reports reported on some concerns about privacy shortcomings period tracking apps, including Ovia, had when it came to the handling of the sensitive user data it can collect.

FInally, Ovia says they use personal information to create de-identified data that they can then use for research purposes. They also say they can use personal data to create aggregated analytic data and statistics which they may share or sell with third parties. Finally, the say they "may disclose or sell de-identified data derived from patient information (as defined by the California Consumer Privacy Act); if so, such patient information is de identified in accordance with HIPAA safe harbor or expert determination de identification requirements." We hope all this de-identified and aggregate data is handled properly so no one can ever be re-identified by their patient or personal data. However, we should mention that it has been found to be relatively easy to re-identify some anonymized data, especially if location data is included.

We do want to give credit where credit is due. Ovia does do a good job explaining how they will handle law enforcement and government requests for their users' data. The have a page on their site that outlines how they handle such data requests and it does all the things we like to see here at Mozilla. They indicate they won't voluntarily disclose users data, that they require valid and legally binding court orders such as subpoenas with clear requests for what data law enforcement is requesting, and that they won't provide data beyond the scope of the valid request and, when possible, will try to limit the scope of data provided. This is all great stuff in our post-Roe v Wade world. Good on you Ovia for providing this clarification.

What's the worst that could happen with Ovia. Well, Ovia does offer coaching services that happen online or over the telephone. And they say that "we collect the information you give to our coaches, which may occur online or through recording of telephone coaching sessions for quality control and monitoring purposes." They also say "your health coach and managers will access your personal data to help you. If you receive Ovia as a benefit from your health insurer or employer health plan, nurse care managers from your health plan (and your employer, if you opt-in to such data sharing) may also have access to your personal data." That's a lot of people who could potentially have access to some sensitive, personal information. Could that data be leaked or shared or accessed by an employee who shouldn't have access or, even worse, handed over to your employer if you weren't clear you were giving consent? It seems possible, if hopefully unlikely. Still, something to consider. And don't forget, Ovia is sharing data about you with Facebook. whether you like it or not. BOO!

Conseils pour vous protéger

  • If you receive Ovia as a benefit from your employer, do not opt in to sharing of your health data with your employer
  • When signing up from outside of US, do not give consent for Ovia and its advertising partners to use your location and personal data, including data about your health, fertility and pregnancy, to display personalized advertising! If you are from the US, better do not use this app.
  • Opt out of third party personalized advertising by going to the Settings menu of your Ovia app and selecting “Do Not Sell My Info” (for California users) or “Manage My Privacy Settings” (for non-US users). US-based non-California users better use another app.
  • Do not connect GoogleFit or Apple Health to the app
  • If you participate in coaching services, do not provide sensitive personal information, as the app collect the information you give to their coaches, which may occur online or through recording of telephone coaching sessions for quality control and monitoring purposes.
  • Do not sign in via Facebook - better sign in via email and password
  • Chose a strong password! You may use a password control tool like 1Password, KeePass etc
  • Use your device privacy controls to limit access to your personal information via app (do not give access to your camera, microphone, images and videos, other files)
  • Keep your app regularly updated
  • Limit ad tracking via your device (eg on iPhone go to Privacy -> Advertising -> Limit ad tracking) and biggest ad networks (for Google, go to Google account and turn off ad personalization)
  • Request your data be deleted once you stop using the app. Simply deleting an app from your device does not erase your personal data.
mobile Confidentialité avertissement Sécurité IA

Ce produit peut-il m’espionner ? informations

Caméra

Appareil : Ne s’applique pas

Application : Non

Microphone

Appareil : Impossible à déterminer

Application : Non

Piste la géolocalisation

Appareil : Ne s’applique pas

Application : Oui

Que peut-on utiliser pour s’inscrire ?

Facebook log-in possible

Quelles données l’entreprise collecte-t-elle ?

Comment l’entreprise utilise-t-elle les données ?

We ding this product because they may share personal data with a user's employer health plan, because the app or their advertisement partners may use data on health, fertility and pregnancy for personalized advertising (in the US users must opt-out rather than opt-in). Also, the app collects all contents of coaching sessions for monitoring purposes. Finally, Ovia allows Facebook to collect device information, and data relating to your engagement with their apps, whether or not you use the Facebook login feature.

To use the app, a user must provide consent to Ovia's processing in the United States of their personal data, including data about health, fertility, pregnancy, sex life, and family circumstance. If you give consent, Ovia and its advertising partners may use your location and personal data, including data about your health, fertility and pregnancy, to display personalized advertising. This consent is opt-in only outside of US.

"If you are an Employer user, Ovia does not share your personal health data with your employer unless you expressly opt-in for a specific purpose. We may, in some circumstances consistent with HIPAA and other privacy laws, share personal data with your employer health plan, or with a third party business associate or vendor, and we may share limited identity information (such as name and date of birth) with your employer to verify your eligibility for Ovia benefits."

"We use Facebook technology in our apps so that users can log on via Facebook. This allows Facebook to collect device information, and data relating to your engagement with our apps, whether or not you use the Facebook login feature. Facebook may use that data to personalize advertising to you, both on and off Facebook as described in the Facebook Data Policy."

"If you participate in coaching services, we collect the information you give to our coaches, which may occur online or through recording of telephone coaching sessions for quality control and monitoring purposes. "

"To provide the Consumer version of the Services for free, we sell advertising. To do that, we share indirect identifiers such as the Advertising ID of your device and the advertising targeting criteria relevant to you with our advertising management platform. We also share the Advertising ID of your device with advertisers, advertising platforms and advertising technology providers to allow them to measure and track ad performance."

How the company says they may share data with law enforcement:

"Ovia may access, use and preserve data to comply with law, in anticipation of litigation, for security management and investigation, or to protect the rights or property of Ovia or third parties, even if the data is subject to a deletion request from you. We may also provide information to law enforcement or authorities to protect the safety of users of the apps or others."

Comment pouvez-vous contrôler vos données ?

We ding this app for not being clear about the retention details. And for giving no controls over personalized ads for users in the US outside of California residents. And for retaining of personal data as permitted by applicable law to maintain proper business records even if you exercise your rights to delete data.

"Ovia may access, use and preserve data to comply with law, in anticipation of litigation, for security management and investigation, or to protect the rights or property of Ovia or third parties, even if the data is subject to a deletion request from you. We may also provide information to law enforcement or authorities to protect the safety of users of the apps or others."

You can opt out of third party personalized advertising by going to the Settings menu of your Ovia app and selecting “Do Not Sell My Info” (for California users) or “Manage My Privacy Settings” (for non-US users). For other users, that is, US- based users from outside of California, the app provides no advertisement controls.

You can permanently delete your data and your account in the app. You can also email Ovia at [email protected] to exercise these rights and any other data subject rights provided by law.

If you are a Consumer user, Ovia store your data for the period that your account is active and then for a further period in case you return to use the Services again. After this retention period ends, they will delete your data. The length of the period is unclear.

If you are an Enterprise user, Ovia may be required to delete your data after your Enterprise benefits end. They will notify you before your data is deleted and, where possible, offer you the opportunity to convert your account to a Consumer account and retain your data.

The app provides certain privacy rights, including the rights to correct or delete data. However, they say that "even if you exercise your rights described above, Ovia may retain personal data as permitted by applicable law and to maintain proper business records."

Quel est l’historique de l’entreprise en matière de protection des données des utilisateurs et utilisatrices ?

Moyen

In 2019, the Washington Post reported criticism of Ovia Health for sharing data — though de-identified and aggregated — with employers, who could purchase the period- and pregnancy-tracking app as a health benefit for their workers. People using the employer-sponsored version must currently opt in for this kind of data-sharing.

Informations liées à la vie privée des enfants

The Services are not available to children under 13 or who otherwise require parental consent under applicable law to use the Services or provide personal information to Ovia. Ovia does not collect personal data from children under 13. Ovia does not show advertising to any user under the age of 16. Parents and guardians may include personal data about their baby or child in their Ovia account; the parent or guardian is responsible for ensuring they have the legal right to do so.

Ce produit peut-il être utilisé hors connexion ?

Oui

Informations relatives à la vie privée accessibles et compréhensibles ?

Non

Ovia's Health Apps Privacy Policy is 34 pages long with nearly 12,000 words. Reading it is not easy and is quite time consuming.

Liens vers les informations concernant la vie privée

Ce produit respecte-t-il nos critères élémentaires de sécurité ? informations

Oui

Chiffrement

Oui

Mot de passe robuste

Oui

Mises à jour de sécurité

Oui

Gestion des vulnérabilités

Oui

Ovia Health does not offer a bug bounty program. Vulnerabilities can be reported to [email protected]

Politique de confidentialité

Oui

Le produit utilise-t-il une IA ? informations

Impossible à déterminer

Cette IA est-elle non digne de confiance ?

Impossible à déterminer

Quel genre de décisions l’IA prend-elle à votre sujet ou pour vous ?

L’entreprise est-elle transparente sur le fonctionnement de l’IA ?

Oui

Details on their algorithm can be found here: https://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(19)30432-7/fulltext

Les fonctionnalités de l’IA peuvent-elles être contrôlées par l’utilisateur ou l’utilisatrice ?

Oui

Members are able to accept, decline, or change the fertile window predictions presented to them by the AI algorithm.

Actualités

What Your Period Tracker App Knows About You
Consumer Reports
These kinds of [period-tracking] apps are billed as useful tools for people who are trying to have a baby, want to prevent pregnancy, or need to monitor menstrual-cycle-related health problems such as hormone-triggered migraines. But to do so, the apps collect deeply personal information that can go well beyond the dates of your period. Depending on the app, that can include how often you have sex, if you are trying to have a baby, and whether you engage in unprotected sex, have experienced a miscarriage, or are approaching menopause.
Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade: Should you delete your period-tracking app?
TechCrunch
Though popular, and undoubtedly a useful tool for those who want to plan and avoid pregnancy and track signs of menopause, it’s no secret that the objective of many of these apps — of which there are more than a thousand in the app stores alone — go far beyond that of tracking periods. Monitoring menstrual cycles has proven to be a lucrative business for developers, many of which share users’ personal information and activity on the apps with third-party marketers and advertisers.
The data flows: How private are popular period tracker apps?
Surfshark
Nobody really wants to keep track of their periods in their minds or a wall calendar, which makes period trackers really popular. But are they tracking more than menstrual cycles? To find that out, we took a look at 20 period tracking apps popular in the US and compared their data collection practices.
Here’s What Period Tracking Apps Say They Do With Your Data
Vice
Generally, apps that track menstruation and fertility extract a lot of data from users that previously only a gynecologist got in this much detail. Depending on the app, this can mean scads of information each month about when a period starts, stops, or is interrupted or unusual in some way, the heaviness, lightness, and all kind of other physical qualities of one’s blood. Some apps allow users to track what they were eating, drinking, smoking, and feeling during their period or in the weeks before and after. Some apps also allowed users to track sleep habits, whether they traveled and where, and the list goes on. It’s a treasure trove of personal data.
‘Delete every digital trace of any menstrual tracking’: Are period-tracking apps safe to use in a post-Roe world?
MarketWatch
Pregnancy- and period-tracking apps could pose a risk to users by exposing their information to third parties, according to a report by Atlas VPN that analyzed 10 of these pregnancy- and period-tracking apps. “Apps dedicated to women’s health, like pregnancy or period trackers, heavily collect sensitive data and share it with third parties,” the report said.

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