Ace 2 this product meets our minimum security standards
Fitbit $69.95

Ace 2

Review Date 10/23/19

Motivating kids to move these days has come to this -- fitness trackers for the 6 and up crowd. Fitbit's wearable tracker for kids comes with activity and sleep tracking, 5-days of battery life, and a way for kids to customize the face. Parents get parental controls where they can track their kids activity and approve connections with friends, set-up goals and rewards for activity, and encourage competition between their siblings. Gone are the days of Dad yelling at you to get off your lazy butt and go outside! Now there's a device for that.

Minimum Security Standards

Five basic steps every company should take to protect consumer privacy. Learn more.

Overall Security Rating
4.5/5 star
Encryption
Yes
Fitbit protects data sent between your device and the Fitbit app with strong encryption.
Security updates
Yes
Updates are pushed automatically when you pair your device with the app.
Strong password
N/A
Wearable devices run over a secure Bluetooth connection from an app on your phone or tablet. In order to use the app, an account with a strong password is required.
Manages vulnerabilities
Yes
Fitbit has a bug bounty program, which means that anyone who finds a security issue and discloses it responsibly may get paid.
Privacy policy
Yes
Does it have a privacy policy?

Can it snoop on me?

Camera
Device: No | App: Yes
Microphone
Device: No | App: Yes
Tracks Location
Device: No | App: Yes

How does it handle privacy?

How does it share data?
Fitbit may share aggregated, de-identified data for analytics. This means that Fitbit can strip your data of personal information and then pool it with other user data. Child accounts have additional, stricter rules about data collection and use.
Can you delete your data?
Yes
Parental controls?
Yes
Collects biometrics data?
Yes
Tracks steps, active minutes, and hours of sleep.
User friendly privacy info?
Yes
Fitbit's privacy information is written in fairly simple language. It also has a page explaining its approach to children's privacy.
Links to privacy information
😮

What could happen if something went wrong

Fitbit does appear to take privacy and security seriously. They meet our Minimum Security Standards and Fitbit says they take extra privacy considerations for children including "more limited data collection and use, e.g., a child’s email and last name are not collected, and weight and calories burned are not provided for child accounts." However, the device tracks the activity and sleep of a child. Parents should ask themselves, "Is this information I want gathered and potentially accessible to others about my child?" Also, there is a good question to be raised about teaching young children that this level of digital surveillance in their lives is OK. Oh, and news recently broke that Google is buying Fitbit. What does that mean? We don't know quite yet, but it does seem that all that sensitive data Fitbit collects will now be owned by Google, a company that likes to have as much data on people as possible.

How to contact the company

Phone Number (844) 434-8248
Twitter FitbitSupport

Updates

Is the clock ticking on kids smartwatches?
Kidscreen
Kids smartwatches don’t have the best reputation. The German telecommunications regulator, Federal Network Agency, banned the sale of smartwatches aimed at children and urged parents to destroy the devices, describing them as spying tools.
Should children wear fitness trackers?
Techradar
What you need to know about activity tracking for kids
How to make sure your fitness trackers are secure
The Verge
Some tips for keeping your tracking data safe
A Google Fitbit means new possibilities and questions for the smartwatch
CNET
Google's Fitbit acquisition will lead to a new Google watch on the horizon. But will Fitbit users get their sensitive data pulled into a bigger ecosystem?
Google is buying Fitbit: now what?
The Verge
Google is buying Fitbit and the reasons why are both simple and complicated. It’s the kind of big acquisition Google has done before (more money than YouTube, less than Nest or DoubleClick), but this one seems to have struck a particular nerve. My Twitter replies are currently filled with Fitbit customers promising to go buy Apple Watches right now.

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