Working Open Resources for the New Year

By Kristina Gorr | Jan. 16, 2020 | Mozilla Festival

MozFest 2019 Working Open Resources in Practice MozFest 2019 Working Open Resources in Practice

What are your resolutions for the new year?

To start a new project? To broaden the reach of an established project? To strengthen your connection with a community? To learn something new?

Whatever your goals, whether baby steps or giant leaps, set yourself up for success this year by using open and collaborative practices in your goal-setting. Here are a few ways to get started that utilize working open resources from around the internet health movement.

4 Working Open Resources for The New Year

1) Set better career and project goals. Opensource.com provides helpful and easy-to-follow guidelines for setting better career goals. “The Open Decision Framework provides a useful process for setting goals transparently and collaboratively. Applying it to goal setting means identifying people that will be impacted by your goals or those who could help you make them better.“

2) Take new steps towards making your project open and collaborative. This easy-to-use Working Open Checklist is another great place to set your project up for open and collaborative success. This checklist includes things you can start TODAY for those new to working open and includes things that even the most seasoned “open” individual can utilize. Make a copy and remix it to tailor the checklist for your specific community and work.

3) Look to others who’ve had success. There are many individuals and organizations who are great working open models to learn from. For example, Openscapes, founded by Julia Lowndes, provides community and resources for championing open practices in environmental science.

“Openscapes is about engaging, empowering, and amplifying each other as we increase the visibility, value, and practice of open data science within our scientific communities. We look forward to opening the landscapes of science and sharing more stories to help create an efficient, open culture for science.”

For anyone interested in working open and collaborative practices, Openscapes serves as a great model for others to follow.

For further reading on Openscapes: Open Software Means Kinder Science by Julia Lowndes published in Scientific American.

4) Connect with like-minded communities. Connecting with a community who values openness will take you far in your work this year. Join us and dozens of supporters in the openness slack channel. (If you’re not yet on slack, join here).

This is just the tip of the working open resources iceberg. Reach out to others and do your own research to find more that works for your specific project and career. You can also visit the Open Leadership & Events team page for free working open resources such as e-courses, training materials, reading lists, and much more.

About the Author

Kristina Gorr is a connector and relationship builder of Mozilla communities. She loves using her passion for writing to pull together communication campaigns for MozFest and the Open Leadership and Events team. Her Mozilla superhero powers include curating newsletters, mad organizational skills, rallying and connecting the community, designing teaching kits, and lending her eagle eye for editing assistance. Her working open top pick: Open Leadership 101 – a free, hour-long online introduction to “working open.”


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